Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Wednesdays with Words: The Wild Thyme Blows


We have been reading such good things in school, working our way through Kidnapped and A Midsummer Night's Dream in particular.  I posted pictures of my commonplace book last week with quotes from both; one I liked the ideas within and the other two quotes the poetics of.

I mean, the assonance and near rhyme that Scott and Shakespeare used for setting a mood - of drearieness or amusement - are subtle when read to oneself and much more blatant aloud.  Read "The nearer I got to that, the drearier it appeared." with a Scots accent and it becomes eerie.  And, poor Bottom, extempore roaring? He is so unaware of the humor he provides us.

But these quotes are not the one I have chosen for today.  I choose one not new to me - but new in context - from our Shakespeare reading.  A verse I was first introduced to reading Ken Ludwig's How to Teach Your Children Shakespeare. It's lovely and breezy at first, but becomes much more devious - in a way to move the plot along - as Oberon decides upon his trickery.  The first part is so lovely, though, so gentle and descriptive:







9 comments:

  1. We've been reading Macbeth & tonight two of my girls were insulting each other with some quotes...'thou cream faced loon' etc. I started your motto book with my 10 year old & it's been going well. She's enjoying it & started writing out some of it & decorating around it.

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    1. My kids dislike the tragedies excessively. I hope they will take the insults and laugh with them like that someday.

      I'm glad she's enjoying it and finding it worth writing out and decorating. [puttingmetotheblush]

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  2. I know this quote & book! :) Are you all using it to memorize also? It's fun to see our love & understanding of Shakspeare grow!

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    1. We aren't currently memorizing from it. I read the book when it first came out and enjoyed it a lot. It took the fear of Shakespeare out. We just happened upon the passage in our read through AMND.

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  3. Love this passage and I'm glad Ludwig picked it as the first memorization challenge. One thing I've become convinced of in the past few years: Shakespeare isn't meant to be read, or at least not silently. Read aloud is better and actually hearing & seeing it acted is best.

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    1. Yes I think so too. I heard a speaker in Cincinnati a couple of years ago about people opening homes, gathering, assigning parts and reading plays. Sounds like fun someday. Seeing it is hard, our local troop does crazy things with the setting and whatnot. I mean to go someday, though.

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  4. I was perusing my copy last week and deciding what next to read together. It's an inspiring book.
    Love your quote image.

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  5. My kids loved memorizing this passage and the one Ludwig suggests for Hamlet. They make great copywork, too!

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  6. We are getting ready to start this play tomorrow. We have seen it in Indianapolis. The problem with seeing the comedy's is the crudeness. I was really shocked when we went to see Two Gentlemen of Verona. I was thankful that much of it went over my daughter's head, but it was pretty bad. I'm not familiar enough with the originals, but next time I will make sure I know what we are getting into.

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